RF-1 launched – Numerical Audio add an AU reverb to their iOS music app catalogue

Download from iTunes App Storerf-1-logo-1I reviewed the excellent RP-1 from Numerical Audio and developer Kai Aras here on the Music App Blog when it was first launched. It provides a compact, but well-featured delay effect and is capable of both conventional and more creative treatments.

RP-1 is a universal app, requires iOS9.0 or later, is a 19MB download and is priced at just UK£4.49/US$5.99. As well as launching with Audiobus and IAA support, the app also included both Ableton Link (tempo sync your delays via Link) and Audio Units (AU) support. The latter means that you can, of course, run multiple instances of the app within a suitable AU host such as MultitrackStudioCubasis, Modstep or AUM.

RF-1 - Kai Aras adds a reverb app to sit alongside the already excellent RP-1 delay app.

RF-1 – Kai Aras adds a reverb app to sit alongside the already excellent RP-1 delay app.

Anyway, Kai has obviously been busy because, as well as regular updates to RP-1, launched today is a new iOS music app; RF-1. And, as RF-1 was all about delays, it perhaps isn’t too much of a surprise that RF-1 is all about reverb. With a similar compact format, and a similar set of iOS music tech features – yes, including AU support – RF-1 is available on the App Store from today.

I’ve only had time to give the app a brief audition so far but I have to say that I’m already impressed. technically it seems solid and I had no issues running multiple AU instances or in using the app via Audiobus or IAA. However, given that it seems to occupy a pretty modest footprint, and is very easy to use, it also sound pretty good to my ears also. There are five basic reverb algorithms provided – hall, plate, ensembleverb, tremoloverb and vintageverb – and, as these labels might suggest, they span conventional treatments and more creative treatments.

The AU format does, of course, mean multiple instances of the app are available in a suitable AU host.

The AU format does, of course, mean multiple instances of the app are available in a suitable AU host.

However, the app also provides plenty of ways to further tweak your reverb properties with the key controls split into two panels – Space and Color – so you can adjust the ‘size’ of the reverb but also its tonal properties. Again, I’ll dig in more when I do a full review of the app but there is plenty of control here to let you dial in just the right ambience for your project.

As with RP-1, there is little not to like about RF-1 and it’s great to see (a) a developer who is obviously so active and (b) keen to embrace the AU format. And, as it is also priced at just UK£4.49/US$5.99, for keen iOS music app fans who use reverb treatments on a regular basis, this is pretty much a no-brainer. Both RF-1 and RP-1 are no fuss to use, sounds great and very affordable. If you have not done so already, you can read the full RP-1 review here but, while a full review of RF-1 will be coming shortly, it already comes highly recommended.

RF-1 reverb


RP-1 delay


 

Be Sociable; share this post....

    Comments

    1. An instant buy for me, being familiar with the quality of RP-1. So far, having a blast with this under AUM.

      • Hi Nathan…. yep, both of these apps are spot-on in terms of design, ease of use and, of course, in having the AU format…. Excellent stuff…. best wishes, John

    Speak Your Mind

    *